We’re a pretty helmeted bunch around here. We always wear a lid when skiing, snowboarding, climbing, cycling, and, of course, roller derby, and, really, wouldn’t do it any other way. But not everyone does, and hey that’s cool, whatever. Still, having coming to the conclusion that the benefits of wearing a helmet far outweigh the hassles in most cases, we’re intrigued by the arguments against. Here are 11 of the most common ones.

1. There’s no helmet for all your other body parts
“I don’t wear a helmet because I take the view that the best helmet in the world won’t stop me getting my legs run over, or me breaking my arm or getting a handlebar punched in the chest.” LINK

2. Cars give you less room when you wear a helmet
“The problem is that wearing a helmet might actually lead to you getting hit. for instance, one study found that drivers got six inches closer to riders that were wearing helmets.” LINK

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3. They make you look awful
“As a woman of a certain age, I have to admit that vain as it may sound, I simply refuse to wear a helmet because I look so awful!” LINK

4. They increase risk
“I don’t wear a helmet because it increases the risk of serious brain injury.” LINK

5. No proof that they help for the way you ride
“The point of view that I’ve come to on the issue, is that there is not enough proof (either from research or anecdotal experience) that the way I ride a bicycle is significantly dangerous for me to wear a helmet, given how much protection a helmet offers me, how much risk I believe is involved, and how much risk I am comfortable with. I know that equation is going to work out differently for every person, so I’m not bothered by someone who chooses to wear a helmet.” LINK

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6. It’s impossible to hit your head when falling off your bike
“After riding a Tour Easy for over 15 years, probably approaching 100,000 miles, and having gone down a half-dozen times, always due to sliding on wet/dirty pavement, I am certain that it is virtually impossible to hit your head when coming off a bike like this.” LINK

7. You’re just sport climbing/there’s no loose rock
“I have to say, most of the time I’m sport climbing I don’t bother to wear one. Depends on the area and the quality of the rock, and the location of other climbers/tourons, but most of the time I opt not to wear one.” LINK

8. It interferes with your skiing experience
“Skiing is about the wind in your hair and the sun on your face as you personally describe the contours of snow-covered mountains at extraordinary speed. It is the closest many of us come to flight. It is my humble but deep belief that it should involve the maximum communion with nature, and that means no helmet for me.” LINK

9. It blocks your vision and hearing
“As a ski instructor, I do not wear a helmet because it affects my awareness, both visual and auditory. My periphery vision is limited, my hearing is impaired and awareness is paramount to my job.” LINK

10. It doesn’t protect you at high skiing speeds
“Put as simply as I can, the G force your brain is going to undergo in collision increases as a square of your speed. In other words, a helmet that definitely protects you at 10 mph needs four times the protecting at 20 mph and fully SIXTEEN times the protection if you’re going 40 mph (not an uncommon speed for good skiers).” LINK

11. It give you helmet hair
“Arriving with ‘helmet hair’ stopped 27 per cent of women from cycling, while 19 per cent said they wouldn’t want their work colleagues to see them without make-up.” LINK

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Photo by Sergey Mironov/Shutterstock

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Brendan Leonard is a contributing editor to Adventure Journal. Follow him at his blog, Semi-Rad.