facebookpixel

Architect Jeffery Broadhurst built this home for his family on 27 acres of rolling West Virginia hills with a DIY-vibe, relying on friends and neighbors to help with the construction. The cabin sits on the south side of South Fork Mountain, on land that was farmed by the Hinkles 200 years ago (the family cemetery is still just a stone´s throw away). In keeping with the historic nature of the property, board-and-batten siding and a standing seam roof create a simple but elegant structure. Oil lamps provide light, and a small wood-stove heats water through a gravity system, using a hand-powered bilge pump to fill an elevated tank. There´s a rain water collector on the roof for the outdoor shower, and rodent barriers-like the ones traditionally used in the area for storing corn-protect the underside of the house.

Broadhurst used locally milled pine, part of what helped keep the cost of the 196-square-foot cabin affordable.

“It was designed on napkins, envelopes, and church bulletins over three years,” Broadhurst told Custom Home Designer Awards when he won a prize for the design.

ADVERTISEMENT

Nestled between cow pastures before a sweeping expanse of mountains, it´s not hard to imagine this off-the-grid retreat the way it looked when the owners of the bones in the Hinkle cemetery were up and about admiring the very same view.

adventure journal weekend cabin shack at hinkle farm 01

adventure journal weekend cabin shack at hinkle farm 03

adventure journal weekend cabin shack at hinkle farm 06

adventure journal weekend cabin shack at hinkle farm 04

adventure journal weekend cabin shack at hinkle farm 05

adventure journal weekend cabin shack at hinkle farm 02

Weekend Cabin isn’t necessarily about the weekend, or cabins. It’s about the longing for a sense of place, for shelter set in a landscape…for something that speaks to refuge and distance from the everyday. Nostalgic and wistful, it’s about how people create structure in ways to consider the earth and sky and their place in them. It’s not concerned with ownership or real estate, but what people build to fulfill their dreams of escape. The very time-shortened notion of “weekend” reminds that it’s a temporary respite.