The current record for climbing all of the world’s 14 highest mountains in the shortest amount of time is 7 years, 10 months, and 6 days by Korean mountaineer Kim Chang-ho. That is an astonishingly short amount of time for a feat like that; roughly two climbs that could be considered the high point of many mountaineers’ lives, every year, seven years in a row.

Nirmal ‘Nims’ Purja, a former Gurkha soldier from Nepal, is setting out to climb all 14 of those same peaks in seven months.

That’s a feat of human endurance and strength that would be historic, breathtaking, shocking, you name it.

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Purja has recently set out for the first on his list, according to the Himalayan Times. The first part of his frankly unbelievable plan is to bag Everest, Lhotse, Kanchenjunga, Makalu, Dhaulagiri, and Annapurna first, in rapid succession. Than K2, Nanga Parbat, G1, G2, and Broad Peak are next, by August 1. Finally, he’ll attempt Manaslu, Shishapangma, and Cho Oyu by November. All with the help of elite Sherpa climbers.

“During the first phase, I plan to climb the first six peaks including Mt Everest by June 1,” Purja said. That’s less than two months to achieve more than many alpinists would dream of in a life of climbing.

This will not be Purja’s first time blazing up Himalayan mountains in a really big hurry. In 2017, he set a record by climbing Everest, Lhotse, and Makalu in just five days. He actually climbed Everest twice, followed by Lhotse and Makalu in only 17 days.

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The mission to climb all these mountains so quickly means Purja will spend lots of time in the “death zone” above 20,000 feet, in a short time, with very little time to rest and recover at lower altitudes between climbs. Not to mention it’s also weather dependent.

Purja’s expedition is part of what he’s calling Project Possible, a plan to raise funds for British Military and Nepalese charities. So far, he’s raised about $40,000. He also wants to make these climbs simply to inspire people to push far beyond what they thought possible. Hence the Project Possible name.

You can follow along with his expedition on his Facebook page.


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