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Just over a year ago, the Russian architectural firm BIO built its first “proof of concept” modular homes, a 431-square-foot mini-dacha called DublDom, seen here on the outskirts of Moscow. Since then, BIO has introduced a smaller DublDom 26, at 280 square feet, with the same open floor plan and air Scandinavian feel.

Either way, the cabins can be assembled on site and hooked to the grid in one to three days, and the cost is a reasonable 1,170,500 rubles…sounds like a lot, but that works out to about 25,000 U.S. dollars. Alas, the DublDom is only available in Russia.

DublDom

DublDom

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Photos courtesy BIO Architects


Weekend Cabin isn’t necessarily about the weekend, or cabins. It’s about the longing for a sense of place, for shelter set in a landscape…for something that speaks to refuge and distance from the everyday. Nostalgic and wistful, it’s about how people create structure in ways to consider the earth and sky and their place in them. It’s not concerned with ownership or real estate, but what people build to fulfill their dreams of escape. The very time-shortened notion of “weekend” reminds that it’s a temporary respite.


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Steve Casimiro is the editor of Adventure Journal. Follow him on Instagram at @stevecasimiro.