adventure journal weekend cabin locomotive ranch texas 01

adventure journal weekend cabin locomotive ranch texas 01

First impressions can be misleading. A quick glance at the Locomotive Ranch trailer home in South Texas suggestions a mansion, without a towering roofline, but in fact the living space of the riverside getaway is quite small and confined to, yes, the trailer.

The rest of the structure is comprised of a deck, glassed porch, and sleeping porch – mostly strategies to keep out of the Texas sun. Architect Andrew Hinman describes the project this way:

adventure journal weekend cabin locomotive ranch texas 01

adventure journal weekend cabin locomotive ranch texas 01

adventure journal weekend cabin locomotive ranch texas 01

adventure journal weekend cabin locomotive ranch texas 01

adventure journal weekend cabin locomotive ranch texas 01

adventure journal weekend cabin locomotive ranch texas 01

adventure journal weekend cabin locomotive ranch texas 01One of the client’s cherished possessions is a vintage streamlined aluminum house (not travel) trailer, and he wanted to relocate the trailer to the family’s favorite spot on their South Texas ranch overlooking the Nueces River. Given the fragile geology and the flash-flood prone nature of the riverside location, the trailer’s foundation and protection required special considerations. The resulting solution is a steel-framed, metal-roofed cradle, right at home amongst the existing rain barns and ranch equipment sheds. The cradle lifts the trailer above the flood plain and provides accessory components, sweeping river views, and safe access to the fishing/swimming hole. The cradle is anchored by a concrete blockhouse containing utilities, storage, and bathroom and topped by a screened sleeping loft.

ADVERTISEMENT

Weekend Cabin isn’t necessarily about the weekend, or cabins. It’s about the longing for a sense of place, for shelter set in a landscape…for something that speaks to refuge and distance from the everyday. Nostalgic and wistful, it’s about how people create structure in ways to consider the earth and sky and their place in them. It’s not concerned with ownership or real estate, but what people build to fulfill their dreams of escape. The very time-shortened notion of “weekend” reminds that it’s a temporary respite.
aj logo 35

Adventure Journal doesn’t accept sponsored content, native advertising, or paid reviews. Here’s why.

The AJ staff is smaller than you think. Here’s a peek behind the scenes.

Here’s why Adventure Journal was launched and how we follow ethical business and publishing practices.


Adventure Journal in print is like Adventure Journal online x 100—and print stories can only be found there. Subscribe to get it now—we guarantee you’ll love it.


Steve Casimiro is the editor of Adventure Journal. Follow him on Instagram at @stevecasimiro.