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As projects go, the Signal Shed is low-key. It’s small and unadorned, just a simple one-room shelter to protect from the elements. Materials were hand-carried to the site and a portable generator was used to power tools. The red cedar cladding was provided by a mill that specializes in fallen and discarded trees, and the hardware for the doors and windows was reclaimed.

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But, man, what a spot. Signal Shed is located in a stunning location in the Wallowas of Oregon, hard up against the Eagle Cap Wilderness, and it poses the question, how much do you really need from your cabin, anyway?


Photos by Ryan Lingard Design

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Weekend Cabin isn’t necessarily about the weekend, or cabins. It’s about the longing for a sense of place, for shelter set in a landscape…for something that speaks to refuge and distance from the everyday. Nostalgic and wistful, it’s about how people create structure in ways to consider the earth and sky and their place in them. It’s not concerned with ownership or real estate, but what people build to fulfill their dreams of escape. The very time-shortened notion of “weekend” reminds that it’s a temporary respite.


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