Signs of the Apocalypse: BMW Designs Ultra-Luxury Gondola Cars

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If we do this right, we can just dispense with the skiing altogether. Forget the icky snow, the yucky cold, and the unforgiving tyranny of clean air. We’ll just ride up and down in BMW’s new luxury gondola cars, swathed in veal-leather comfort, and sip zinfandels while listening to Yanni on the surround sound. Only we’ll have to do it in Hochzillertal, Austria, site of the first of these Series 7-inspired gondola cars.

Hochzillertal has 181 kilometers of trails, not that we’ll need them. But it will give us something to look down upon as we float over the Osterreich alpine, satisfied that our money was well spent.

But I mock. Absurd as it is to swath a ski gondola with leather from BMW limousines, the special luxury package might actually be a smart bet. For 150 Euros, about $190, you get two-day lift tickets for two people and line-cutting privileges. That’s actually 26 Euros less than standard two-day passes, plus — are you ready for this? — you get brunch, a commemorative Alpine Grooves CD (Volume 4!), and use of a waterbed at Hochzillertal’s Sun Lounge.

Seriously, you can’t make this stuff up.

Hat tip: Get Outdoors

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{ 9 comments…read them below or write one }

  • Andy

    I’m reminded of the scene from Christmas Vacation where the neighbors return home to their house that Clark’s gutter-ice-missile had just destroyed.

  • Matt Freeman

    Forgive me for putting on my business helmet, but if I’m BMW and the appropriate resort (I can’t comment on Hochzillertal as I know nothing about it), this just makes sense.

    Skiing as a sport skews to a more affluent and educated demographic — I’ve seen the numbers, and it’s why many luxury auto manufacturers attempt to associate themselves with the sport. For a luxury manufacturer, half the battle for sales is won simply by getting people to sit in their vehicles (the old “butts in seats” phenomenon) which is why luxury guys have so many test drive events. Can’t tell you how many I’ve seen at golf and ski resorts. So this makes sense — why not pique the interest of prospective luxury car buyer by integrating the product experience (the interior) into the activity experience? And for the ski resorts, create another revenue stream (as we know, resorts are always looking for that) that is no doubt partially subsidized by the BMW branding?

    Look, it ain’t for me nor for most readers of this blog but I’d suspect there going to be a fairly high number of folks who take advantage of the opportunity. Given the economics of the opportunity (being cheaper than the standard two-day ticket) it just makes sense.

    Though Chris’s point is well-taken. I can only imagine the photogs’s direction. Anyone know how to say “act douchey” in German?

    • steve casimiro Post author

      Matt — your points are well-made and well-taken. But another perspective is that skiing, by itself, is enough, and the sport doesn’t need to attract people whose sentiments are to insulate themselves even further from nature, the outdoors, and adventure.

  • Sarah

    I agree with Matt.
    It is not exactly the same thing, but I sure enjoy my down jackets, GoreTex pants, and high performance you name it, whenver I go outside to play. Am I less comitted because I wear name brands?
    I think the pictures are obnoxious, but I dont think enjoying a little comfort and luxury means you arent as hardcore as the guy who is sleeping in his van in the parking lot.

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