Climate Change Enters Presidential Race – One Side of It, Anyway

Share on Tumblr

Climate change may not have been front and center during the three-round presidential debate series, but President Obama did address the issue Friday on MTV during a Q&A with host Sway Williams.

During the interview, Obama said climate is a critical issue and that increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases are the root cause.

“I am surprised it didn’t come up in one of the debates,” Obama said in response to a question from Williams. “Governor Romney says he believes in climate change. That’s different than a lot of members of his own party that deny it completely. But he’s not sure that man-made causes are the reason. I believe scientists who say we are putting too much carbon emissions into the atmosphere and it’s heating the planet and it’s going to have a severe effect.”

“After hearing from thousands of young voters, we were glad that President Obama finally broke the silence on climate change, which is one of the most important issues to young voters,” said Maura Cowley, director of Energy Action Coalition. “President Obama acknowledged that ‘we’re not moving fast enough to address the climate crisis,’ and we couldn’t agree more.

“The climate crisis is a top issue for the youth vote because we have the most to lose if we don’t address it, and want to see more investment in creating a clean energy economy,” Cowley said. “Thousands of young voters are turning out to demand climate action this election—in fact more than 10,000 have joined the PowerVote campaign to demonstrate that climate is their top priority. This election, and the climate crisis, are about our future, and we’ll continue to demand leadership from candidates on this issue, up to and through Election Day.”

“President Obama was right to finally tout the steps his administration has taken to cut carbon pollution, and to acknowledge that ’we’re not moving as fast as we need to,’” responded Brad Johnson, campaign manager of Forecast the Facts and ClimateSilence.org.

“But the President shouldn’t pretend to be befuddled about why he promoted deadly coal, gas, and oil production during the debates instead of addressing the urgent threat of carbon pollution. And it’s unfortunate that the President continued to portray global warming as a future threat, especially as the freakish Hurricane Sandy barrels down on millions of Americans, fueled by superheated seas,” Johnson said.

Transcript (courtesy MTV and ClimateSilence.org):

Q: Until this year global climate change has been discussed in every presidential debate since 1988. It was a big part of your previous campaign but pushed back on the back burner. Given the urgency of the threat, do you feel that we’re moving quickly enough on this issue, number one, and Samantha from New Jersey wants to know what will you do to make it a priority?

OBAMA: The answer is number one, we’re not moving as fast as we need to. And this is an issue that future generations, MTV viewers, are going to have to be dealing with even more than the older generation. So this is a critical issue. And there is a huge contrast in this campaign between myself and Governor Romney. I am surprised it didn’t come up in one of the debates. Gov. Romney says he believes in climate change. That’s different than a lot of members of his own party that deny it completely. But he’s not sure that man-made causes are the reason. I believe scientists who say we are putting too much carbon emissions into the atmosphere and it’s heating the planet and it’s going to have a severe effect.

There are a lot of things we have done a lot of things in the last four years. We have already doubled the fuel efficiency standards on cars and trucks. That’s the first increase in 30 years in the fuel mileage standards. As a consequence we will be taking huge amounts of carbon out of the atmosphere, even as we’re also saving folks money at the pump and reducing our dependence on foreign oil.

We have doubled clean energy production — wind, solar, biofuels — and that means that increasingly people are getting electricity, companies are generating power, without the use of carbon-producing fuels. And that’s helping as well.

The next step is to deal with buildings and really ramp up our efficiency in buildings. If we had the same energy efficiency as Japan, we would cut our energy use by about 20 percent, and that means we’d be taking a whole lot of carbon out of our atmosphere.

And if we do those things, we can meet the targets that I negotiated with other countries in Copenhagen, to bring our carbon emissions down by about 17 percent, even as we’re creating good jobs in these industries.

In order for us to solve the whole problem though, we’re gonna have to have some technological breakthroughs. Because countries like China and India, they’re building coal-power plants and they feel that they have to prioritize getting people out of poverty ahead of climate change. So what we have to do is help them and help ourselves by continuing to put money into research and technology about how do we really get the new sources of power that are going to make a difference.

Environmental coverage made possible in part by support from Patagonia. For information on Patagonia and its environmental efforts, visit www.patagonia.com. In affiliation with Summit County Voice.

Share on Tumblr

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>